Monday, April 07, 2008

What type of coax cable should I use for my television?

First figure out what you're installing it for. If you're putting it in to run regular cable television (CATV) or master antenna television (MATV), you don't need coax with special sweep-testing. The signals from these types of inputs are very strong. If you're planning on using satellite television (SATV), however, you'll want to make sure that you use coax that has been sweep-tested to 3GHz as recommended by most satellite service providers.

In any of these cases, you want to use RG-6.

Then it comes down to the shielding. Coaxial cable has two types of shielding: a foil and a braid. A 40% braid is a loose braid and is the most economical. It is generally used in places like motels where getting perfect reception isn't terribly important because people will only be there for a night or two. A 60% braid is the standard braid for RG-6. Most professional installers use RG-6 with a 60% braid. Quadshield coaxial cable has two foils and two braids. RG-6 Quadshield is the premium choice for RG-6 and is used by most people who have the chance to choose the cable for their own systems.


The type of conductor in your coaxial cable will also be important. The two conductors you will find in coax are copper clad steel (CCS) or solid copper core (SCC). Copper clad steel will be suitable for most installations, but if you want the best signal possible, then you should look to purchase a cable that has a solid copper conductor. The stronger signal produced by a solid copper conductor is ideal when you are using a satellite signal or you are looking for the best signal for your HDTV. The copper clad steel conductor will work for both satellite and HDTV, but to make sure your signal is as strong as it could be, then use the solid copper conductor.

Another thing to look for is UL listing or ETL verification. This independent testing ensures that cable actually is what the seller or manufacturer claims that it is. There is a lot of bargain coax out there without any sort of independent testing mark, so you'll want to specifically ask about this before making a purchase.

9 Comments:

At March 25, 2009 at 7:07 AM, Blogger Along Parker said...

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At November 8, 2009 at 3:21 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

 
At February 11, 2010 at 7:23 AM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

RG6 is not really suitable for outside have a look at some of the professional aerial installer sites from the uk see http://www.wrightsaerials.tv/articles/coax-cable-quality.shtml as an example

 
At August 11, 2010 at 11:06 PM, Blogger kimberly said...

I must to say this blog is very interesting,actually all the ideas in this blog catched my attention. I threw some cables once but i didnĀ“t know how useful they can be.

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At September 22, 2012 at 9:57 PM, Blogger DEBRA SWANSON said...

Hi, I have just downgraded my HD cable services to basic cable to save money. I now have a the cable from the cable company and i have a wall mounted HD TV with the cables inside the walls. Is there a way to connect the cable company cable to my HDMI cable? thanks.
Kind Regards, Debra

 
At January 10, 2013 at 2:19 PM, Blogger David Hurst said...

Concise and well written. Thanks

 
At March 27, 2013 at 10:28 AM, Blogger Home Security Expert said...

Thanks took your advice on the coaxial cable for my satellite tv

 
At April 10, 2014 at 1:57 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

thanks for your advice place i want to learn RF technology you wants to help me?

 
At October 29, 2014 at 6:37 AM, Blogger francis beth said...

Your blogs and its stuff are so notable and worthwhile it can make me return.http://www.digitec-aerials.co.uk/kendal-tv-aerial-installation--satellite-dish-installers.html

 

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